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  • Linda Stegmeyer

Welcome to 2020!

Updated: Jan 2

As the sun goes down on this, the first day of January, 2020, I hope you are filled with the enthusiasm and hope that every new year offers. May it bring you health, prosperity, and the fulfillment of promises you've made to yourself as you cross over into the new year. For some of us, that promise might be to lose weight. For others, it might be to start a novel, or create a family tree. For you, this could be the year when you become more comfortable with English; not your mother tongue, but the language of the country you've adopted.


I get it. One of the most frustrating, difficult things about learning a new language is when you know what you want to say but you just can't find the words. This happens over and over again while learning, and sometimes it's so overwhelming that retreat feels like the only option. However, if you isolate yourself linguistically and culturally, you'll have to look on while others enjoy what participation in life can bring. It can make you feel alone in this world, but I want you to know that you're not alone.


I understand. As a young woman living in a foreign land, I experienced firsthand what it's like to learn a new language as an adult; to navigate a new environment and culture in that language, feeling like a child but trying to retain some dignity as an adult. Eventually, I did learn the language of my new country and how to get through the challenges of everyday life. I was still me inside, but enhanced. My experiences made me more. You can maintain your cultural and linguistic identity while learning the language and the culture of the people around you. You can live life as a participant, not just an observer.


I can help you develop a vocabulary that reflects your everyday life and needs. Together, we can practice conversational skills so that you can converse with greater ease and confidence. Those skills will help you make doctor appointments, ask for directions, and talk to teachers; in short, to navigate everyday life. Are you ready to speak conversational English? Let's talk!


All my best now and in the coming year,

Linda







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